It must feel awkward to be a common denominator.

Like normalised data, you jam easily,

Your labeling exercise is slow, repetitive, and boring. It doesn’t scale well.

So you chose to Ignore a thing that will happen again

You will say you’re still learning, and you will make more yearning sounds.

Those who were watching lost the plot.

And the errors of your youth, cost lives, all the way to Myanmar.

All because you let YouTube teach you how to share.

This is not how you learn. Didn’t anyone ever tell you all the good stuff is in the footnotes?

You see, they called them the footnotes of History, because they’re the sound of realities, stomping their feet, resonating, and amplifying. 

You need to learn about footnotes.

They’re the best.

Culture 101, but make it scale

Marc Augé explained non-places as places of anonymity and loneliness. 

All I ever saw was the freedom of nowherness.

I wonder how it feels to see the world as the negative imprint of yourself.

To see the rest of the world as a sock-puppet.

I think about all the mushy cloudy tone-deaf nothingness that must have filled the room, 

when snapchat created that filter asking people to break chains with a smile

How do you fix a culture that misinterpreted nihilism as an ending, rather than a call to action?

People who see the world as data in the void of their own shiny surface?

How do you teach subtext to people who train their brains to respond to systems seamlessly,

Then call it the study of user experience.

How can we talk about margins and centers

When Diversity and Inclusion looks like entropy

Well if you don’t know, then you’re not a problem solver.

You’re not a clever clicker.

Your whole toolbox is wrong.

What’s worse, you’re not a Happy Camper, and for that, we will help.

There are workshops on the art of crucial conversations

And they comes with a book, that we will buy for you.

problem solved.

The Journey is 1%

https://allthebigdata.wordpress.com/2020/06/29/not-a-computer-you-dummie/

I am certain, with every fiber in me, that an exotic labeling exercise, is not the right way to address reality.

I am certain, with every fiber of the strand I see,

That my culture is the transactions best articulated around my twists and kinks,

It’s a complex, kinetic web, that I thoroughly enjoy.

Not sharpened spikes, made soft for you. 

So fuck you for messing with my liminality, and forcing me to a frontline, that puts you at ease, and leaves me exhausted.

Thankfully, Resonance is everywhere.

“To evoke magic is not only to provide an alternative regime of causal relations, but also to minimize the attention to the methods and resources required to carry out a particular effect.” 

When the people in swag say Big Data.

When they have bright ideas,

And they say they’ll fix the thing,

When they mean it. Be afraid.

They’ll MECE and map it, 
They’ll juggle then drown in it.
If Big Data meant anything smart,
They would have called it Smart Data.
Instead it's just...big?

When you think of shiny magic bricks,

Smooth algorithmic magic tricks,

Remember that it is instead,

Hundreds, thousands of bureaucrats.

A Nasdaq-run Ministry of Interior for 3 billion people.
Bureaucrats attempting bad haikus in sql. 

They share micro-agressions in micro-kitchens,

(Online too, and mostly about the food)

Food is a big deal, food is culture.

There is so much culture.

Like that Middle Eastern Lunch on the first day of Ramadan 🙂

Remind me to tell you the story sometime.

Anyway…bureaucrats.

Solving the world’s problems (and proving Hannah Arendt right at every turn).

And there are no adults in the room.

Really, no adults in the room.

They want to colonize the moon.

We need to save the moon.

So there’s no magic and no adults,

Only tired and confused bureaucrats,

With deadlines and performance reviews.

They just want the next promotion.

What is there but the next promotion.

The system rewards Ruthless Prioritization.
I was told I was good at it, so let me explain:
The trick is to manage your emotional bandwidth, 
and pick your trauma wisely.

It helps if you smile a lot in emails.

Sometimes there will be no data.

The trick is knowing when to let it burn,

And conjure up data points out of the ashes of a PR fire.

Now don't you wish you picked your trauma wisely?

Don’t forget to look nonthreatening (straighten your curls).

(but also ruthless). 

🙂

The trick is to pretend it’s AI.

Just call everything a process. Even everyone.

And pray they don’t spit in your face,
But also hope they do, because you deserve it. 
Add a sticker to your email. 

Aren’t we all processes?

I’m a cog in a glorified call center with a yoga studio,

I get assigned a Personal Development coach.

Aren’t we all princesses? 

It helps if you blink at randomized intervals.

Finding joy in the purpose is what breeds dissent.

And there is always tomorrow. So much tomorrow.

You calibrate and find joy in processes at scale.

Introduce Yourself (Example Post)

This is an example post, originally published as part of Blogging University. Enroll in one of our ten programs, and start your blog right.

You’re going to publish a post today. Don’t worry about how your blog looks. Don’t worry if you haven’t given it a name yet, or you’re feeling overwhelmed. Just click the “New Post” button, and tell us why you’re here.

Why do this?

  • Because it gives new readers context. What are you about? Why should they read your blog?
  • Because it will help you focus your own ideas about your blog and what you’d like to do with it.

The post can be short or long, a personal intro to your life or a bloggy mission statement, a manifesto for the future or a simple outline of your the types of things you hope to publish.

To help you get started, here are a few questions:

  • Why are you blogging publicly, rather than keeping a personal journal?
  • What topics do you think you’ll write about?
  • Who would you love to connect with via your blog?
  • If you blog successfully throughout the next year, what would you hope to have accomplished?

You’re not locked into any of this; one of the wonderful things about blogs is how they constantly evolve as we learn, grow, and interact with one another — but it’s good to know where and why you started, and articulating your goals may just give you a few other post ideas.

Can’t think how to get started? Just write the first thing that pops into your head. Anne Lamott, author of a book on writing we love, says that you need to give yourself permission to write a “crappy first draft”. Anne makes a great point — just start writing, and worry about editing it later.

When you’re ready to publish, give your post three to five tags that describe your blog’s focus — writing, photography, fiction, parenting, food, cars, movies, sports, whatever. These tags will help others who care about your topics find you in the Reader. Make sure one of the tags is “zerotohero,” so other new bloggers can find you, too.

Introduce Yourself (Example Post)

This is an example post, originally published as part of Blogging University. Enroll in one of our ten programs, and start your blog right.

You’re going to publish a post today. Don’t worry about how your blog looks. Don’t worry if you haven’t given it a name yet, or you’re feeling overwhelmed. Just click the “New Post” button, and tell us why you’re here.

Why do this?

  • Because it gives new readers context. What are you about? Why should they read your blog?
  • Because it will help you focus your own ideas about your blog and what you’d like to do with it.

The post can be short or long, a personal intro to your life or a bloggy mission statement, a manifesto for the future or a simple outline of your the types of things you hope to publish.

To help you get started, here are a few questions:

  • Why are you blogging publicly, rather than keeping a personal journal?
  • What topics do you think you’ll write about?
  • Who would you love to connect with via your blog?
  • If you blog successfully throughout the next year, what would you hope to have accomplished?

You’re not locked into any of this; one of the wonderful things about blogs is how they constantly evolve as we learn, grow, and interact with one another — but it’s good to know where and why you started, and articulating your goals may just give you a few other post ideas.

Can’t think how to get started? Just write the first thing that pops into your head. Anne Lamott, author of a book on writing we love, says that you need to give yourself permission to write a “crappy first draft”. Anne makes a great point — just start writing, and worry about editing it later.

When you’re ready to publish, give your post three to five tags that describe your blog’s focus — writing, photography, fiction, parenting, food, cars, movies, sports, whatever. These tags will help others who care about your topics find you in the Reader. Make sure one of the tags is “zerotohero,” so other new bloggers can find you, too.

Introduce Yourself (Example Post)

This is an example post, originally published as part of Blogging University. Enroll in one of our ten programs, and start your blog right.

You’re going to publish a post today. Don’t worry about how your blog looks. Don’t worry if you haven’t given it a name yet, or you’re feeling overwhelmed. Just click the “New Post” button, and tell us why you’re here.

Why do this?

  • Because it gives new readers context. What are you about? Why should they read your blog?
  • Because it will help you focus your own ideas about your blog and what you’d like to do with it.

The post can be short or long, a personal intro to your life or a bloggy mission statement, a manifesto for the future or a simple outline of your the types of things you hope to publish.

To help you get started, here are a few questions:

  • Why are you blogging publicly, rather than keeping a personal journal?
  • What topics do you think you’ll write about?
  • Who would you love to connect with via your blog?
  • If you blog successfully throughout the next year, what would you hope to have accomplished?

You’re not locked into any of this; one of the wonderful things about blogs is how they constantly evolve as we learn, grow, and interact with one another — but it’s good to know where and why you started, and articulating your goals may just give you a few other post ideas.

Can’t think how to get started? Just write the first thing that pops into your head. Anne Lamott, author of a book on writing we love, says that you need to give yourself permission to write a “crappy first draft”. Anne makes a great point — just start writing, and worry about editing it later.

When you’re ready to publish, give your post three to five tags that describe your blog’s focus — writing, photography, fiction, parenting, food, cars, movies, sports, whatever. These tags will help others who care about your topics find you in the Reader. Make sure one of the tags is “zerotohero,” so other new bloggers can find you, too.